#OpTellTale – The Devil’s/Satan’s Triangle – fits in with the whole Devil, Satan, Lucifer, theme

——————————————————————————————————–

Vile Vortices is a term referring to twelve geographic areas that are alleged by Ivan Sanderson to have been the sites of mysterious disappearances. Sanderson wrote the article “The Twelve Devil’s Graveyards Around the World,” published in Saga magazine.[1]

The vortices

Sanderson asserts that twelve “vortices” are situated along particular lines of latitude.[1]

The best known of the so-called “vortices” is the Bermuda Triangle. Others include Algerian Megaliths to the south of Timbuktu, the Indus Valley in Pakistan, especially the city of Mohenjo Daro, Hamakulia Volcano in Hawaii, the “Devil’s Sea” near Japan and the South Atlantic Anomaly.[2] Five of the vortices are on the same latitude to the south of the equator; five are on the same latitude to the north. The other two are the north and south poles.

The idea has been taken up by other fringe writers, who have argued that the vortices are linked to “subtle matter energy,” “ley lines” or “electro-magnetic aberration”.[3]

Paul Begg, in a series of articles for The Unexplained magazine, criticized the methodology of writers on the subject of unexplained disappearances. He checked original records of the alleged incidents. Often, he found, the ships which were claimed to have ‘mysteriously disappeared’ had a mundane reason for their loss (see for instance Raifuku Maru). Some were lost in storms, although the vortex writers would claim that the weather was fine at the time. In other cases, locations of losses were changed to fit the location of the vortex. Sometimes no record of the ship even existing in the first place was found.[4]

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vile_Vortices

Vile_Vortices_Map

Vile_Vortices_Map1

Vile_Vortices_Map2Vile_Vortices_Map3Vile_Vortices_Map4Vile_Vortices_Map5Vile_Vortices_Map6Vile_Vortices_Map7Vile_Vortices_Map8Vile_Vortices_Map9Vile_Vortices_Map10Vile_Vortices_Map11Vile_Vortices_Map12VileVortex

CropCircle4——————————————————————————————————–

devilstriangle——————————————————————————————————–

The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil’s Triangle, is a loosely defined region in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean, where a number of aircraft and ships are said to have disappeared under mysterious circumstances. According to the US Navy, the triangle does not exist, and the name is not recognized by the US Board on Geographic Names.[1] Popular culture has attributed various disappearances to the paranormal or activity by extraterrestrial beings.[2] Documented evidence indicates that a significant percentage of the incidents were spurious, inaccurately reported, or embellished by later authors.[3][4][5] In a 2013 study, the World Wide Fund for Nature identified the world’s 10 most dangerous waters for shipping, but the Bermuda Triangle was not among them.[6]

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bermuda_Triangle

The first film based on the Bermuda Triangle was the 1975 TV movie Satan’s Triangle.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bermuda_Triangle

See Richard Winer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Winer

——————————————————————————————————–

dragonstriangle——————————————————————————————————–

The Devil’s Sea (魔の海 Ma no Umi?), also known as the Dragon’s Triangle, the Formosa (Taiwan) Triangle (traditional Chinese: 福爾摩沙三角; simplified Chinese: 福尔摩沙三角; pinyin: Fúěrmóshā Sānjiǎo) and the “Pacific Bermuda Triangle“, is a region of the Pacific around Miyake Island, about 100 km south of Tokyo. The Devil’s sea is one of 12 Vile Vortices, originally plotted by Ivan T. Sanderson.[1] The size and area varies with the report (the only reports stem from the 1950s), with various reports placing it 110 kilometres (68 mi) from an unspecified part of Japan’s east coast, 480 kilometres (300 mi) from the coast, and even near Iwo Jima, 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) from the coast.(Kusche:259-260)

This area is said to be a danger zone on Japanese maps, according to Charles Berlitz‘s books The Bermuda Triangle (1974) and The Dragon’s Triangle (1989). He states that in the peacetime years between 1952-54 Japan lost 5 military vessels with crews lost totalling over 700 people and that the Japanese government sent a research vessel with over 100 scientists on board to study the Devil’s Sea, and that this ship too vanished; and finally that the area was officially declared a danger zone.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil%27s_Sea

——————————————————————————————————–

Japan_Nuclear_power_plants_map——————————————————————————————————–

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s