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#OpZion – Another Satanic Freemasonic False Flag Terror Event – Americas 911 Devils Triangle Church Shooting – 9 people shot at 110 Calhoun Street – American terrorists use 911 in their false flag terror events (3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 33, 39) – 911 is a repetitive pattern in American false flag events – Quantum Numerology

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I’m not saying innocent people didn’t die, but I am saying this case has the same numerology as other American terror events where the numbers are 911, it is the same numerology MO as multiple other terror events. It just so happens to be at 9 p.m. at 110 Calhoun Street at a CHRISTIAN church. 9 & 11 are Satanic numbers and Satanists are against Christianity…

The Nine Satanic Statements originally appeared in The Satanic Bible, © 1969

  1. Satan represents indulgence instead of abstinence!
  2. Satan represents vital existence instead of spiritual pipe dreams!
  3. Satan represents undefiled wisdom instead of hypocritical self-deceit!
  4. Satan represents kindness to those who deserve it instead of love wasted on ingrates!
  5. Satan represents vengeance instead of turning the other cheek!
  6. Satan represents responsibility to the responsible instead of concern for psychic vampires!
  7. Satan represents man as just another animal, sometimes better, more often worse than those that walk on all-fours, who, because of his “divine spiritual and intellectual development,” has become the most vicious animal of all!
  8. Satan represents all of the so-called sins, as they all lead to physical, mental, or emotional gratification!
  9. Satan has been the best friend the Church has ever had, as He has kept it in business all these years!

The Eleven Satanic Rules of the Earth by Anton Szandor LaVey © 1967

  1. Do not give opinions or advice unless you are asked.
  2. Do not tell your troubles to others unless you are sure they want to hear them.
  3. When in another’s lair, show him respect or else do not go there.
  4. If a guest in your lair annoys you, treat him cruelly and without mercy.
  5. Do not make sexual advances unless you are given the mating signal.
  6. Do not take that which does not belong to you unless it is a burden to the other person and he cries out to be relieved.
  7. Acknowledge the power of magic if you have employed it successfully to obtain your desires. If you deny the power of magic after having called upon it with success, you will lose all you have obtained.
  8. Do not complain about anything to which you need not subject yourself.
  9. Do not harm little children.
  10. Do not kill non-human animals unless you are attacked or for your food.
  11. When walking in open territory, bother no one. If someone bothers you, ask him to stop. If he does not stop, destroy him.

The shootings took place near the Devils Triangle;

devilstriangleWhat’s even more strange is the 666 in Roofs friends witness testimony;

RoofsFriend666It was a plan, I mean he said he was planning it for 6 months, like I said it was a 6 month plan. And I don’t know how, what, exactly what, in this whole 6 months was his plan at all until we all seen it last night“.

It is another American false flag to be used to take American guns, it is obvious what the US government are doing to take away American citizens guns…the American government are murdering innocent people to disarm the American citizens…it’s Globalists…

The US government are using the same repetitive pattern in multiple terror events…anyone with a brain can see what they’re doing…

Another example of the same numerology can be seen here, it’s exactly the same https://jewishpaedophilia.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/911-was-an-inside-job-the-jews-responsible-for-911/

The Zionist American media will be shit hot on the case to call anyone saying it’s a false flag a conspiracy theorist…it’s text book Globalist false flag…

Numerology is important to some people, it doesn’t matter if it isn’t important to you personally, you didn’t carry out the attack, it shows the attack is well planned in advance. In computer science we use what are known as constants, a variable that doesn’t change and, vectors, positions in 3 dimensional space, which may be why you find the same number patterns in multiple different events, it is a sign that possibly a computer model or scientific methodology is being used to plan certain events, possibly the following methodology;

9 & 11 are numbers used to complete the base of the Freemason Egyptian Eye of Providence Pyramid. Providence, “The protective care of God or of nature as a spiritual power” (Oxford Dictionary, 2015).

Annuit cœptis – providence favours our undertakings

PyramidGeometryNovus ordo seclorum – new order of the ages

Ordo Ab Chao – Order Out of Chaos

The numbers can possibly be worked out in numerology using simple mathematics as follows;

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THREE

21-year-old shooter = 2+1 = 3

Shooter received gun for his 21st birthday = 2+1=3

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SEVEN

Pastor Clementa Pinckney aged 41, elected to the SC House of Representatives in 1996 aged 23

4+1+2 = 7 then you have 3

1996 = 1+6 = 7 then you have 9 & 9

In 2000, he was elected to the state Senate at 27

2+2+7 = 11

Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church has been a presence in Charleston since 1816

1+6 = 7

1+8 = 9

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NINE

Shooting at 9 p.m.= 9

Someone reported the plot to authorities and during the chaos and paranoia that ensued, the church was burned. Congregants slipped underground to worship until 1865 when the church formally reorganized and adopted the name Emanuel.

1+8=9

6+5=11

Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church has been a presence in Charleston since 1816

1+8=9

1+6=7

Shooters father bought him a .45-caliber gun

4+5=9

in 1787, Richard Allen and others of African descent withdrew from St. George’s Methodist Church in Philadelphia because of unkind treatment and restrictions placed upon the worshispers of African descent

1+8=9 then you have 7 & 7

He was the personal servant of slavetrader Captain Joseph Vesey, who settled in Charleston in 1783. Beginning in December 1821, Vesey began to organize a slave rebellion

1+8=9 then you have 7 and 3

1+8=9 then you have 2+1=3

Worship services continued after the church was rebuilt until 1834 when all black churches were outlawed

1+8=9 then you have 3+4=7

The congregation continued the tradition of the African church by worshipping underground until 1865 when it was formally reorganized

1+8=9

6+5=11

The wooden two-story church that was built on the present site in 1872 was destroyed by the devastating earthquake of August 31, 1886

1+8=9

7+2=9

1+8=9

1+8=9

6+3=9

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ELEVEN

Location 110 Calhoun Street = 11 (zeros are dropped)

Shooter arrested about 245 miles away = 2+4+5 = 11

Shooter taken into custody without incident shortly before 11 a.m

The magnificent brick structure with encircling marble panels was restored, redecorated and stuccoed during the years of 1949-51 under the leadership of the Rev. Frank R. Veal.

1+4+5+1=11 then you have 9 and 9

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THIRTEEN

There were 13 people inside the church when the shooting happened — the nine people who were killed and three survivors

In 1822 the church was investigated for its involvement with a planned slave revolt

1+8+2+2=13

South Carolina where the shootings took place has 13 letters

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THIRTY THREE

Shooter was driving a dark in color Hyundai Elantra with vehicle tag LGF330 = 33

Rev. Joe Darby is presiding elder of the 33 churches in the AME Church’s Beaufort District

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SIX SIX SIX

6 women & 3 men or 6, 3 times = 666

In Jewish Gematria the phrase “number of a man barack obama” is 666

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Nine shot, multiple fatalities reported in downtown church shooting

Scene of church shooting at 9 p.m. at 110 Calhoun Street, site of Mother Emanuel AME Church.

Scene of church shooting at 9 p.m. at 110 Calhoun Street, site of Mother Emanuel AME Church. (Matthew Fortner/staff)

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Nine people were shot, some fatally, inside one of Charleston’s oldest and most well known black churches tonight. A bomb threat complicated the investigation and prompted police to ask nearby residents to evacuate.

Reporters and other onlookers huddled at the scene awaiting details on what could prove to be one of the worst mass shootings in South Carolina history.

Mayor Joe Riley confirmed there were fatalities.

“We’re still gathering information so it’s not the time yet for details,” he said. “I will say that this is an unspeakable and heartbreaking tragedy in this most historic church, an evil and hateful person took the lives of citizens who had come to worship and pray together.”

Riley said city police were being assisted by sheriff’s deputies, the State Law Enforcement Division and the FBI.

Police and emergency vehicles swarmed several blocks surrounding Henrietta and Calhoun streets, just east of Marion Square. Barricades blocked off several streets to traffic, and police asked nearby residents to leave their homes.

The shooting occurred around 9 p.m. inside Emanuel AME Church at 110 Calhoun St. Police were seen exiting the 19th century church, and their presence extended blocks beyond the site.

Police were still looking for the gunman late Wednesday, and helicopters are hovering above. Police spokesman Charles Francis described the suspect as a 21-year-old white male in a gray sweatshirt/hoodie and jeans with Timberland boots. He has a slender build.

There are victims involved, but police have not said how many. No deaths have yet been reported. A chaplain is on the scene.

State Sen. Marlon Kimpson, D-Charleston, said he has been talking with Charleston County Sheriff Al Cannon and said, “It’s my understanding that there are some very serious injuries and possibly deaths.”

Kimpson is the Democratic colleague of Sen. Clementa Pinckney, who is the church’s pastor and was believed to be inside during the shooting. Kimpson said he is praying for Pinckney and for “our Mother Emanuel AME church,” as it’s affectionately called by many parishioners. It is the South’s oldest black congregation south of Baltimore.

“I ask the nation to keep Charleston in our prayers,” he said.

Police are looking everywhere in groups on Henrietta Street, in trash cans and under cars. Henrietta runs behind the church, just north of Calhoun.

A huge police and ambulance presence exists with officers wearing bullet-proof vests and carrying guns.

Officials have told people to go indoors or drive away from the area, and several police cars are present on the streets several blocks from the church.

A white male was briefly detained at the Shell gas station at Meeting and Calhoun streets. Two loud pops were heard and a crowd of people rushed to the front of the gas station where they had the male on the ground and were handcuffing him.

The white male had on a backpack and was carrying a camera and recording device fell on the ground near where he was detained.

David Corrie, 21, of Ladson, said he was walking out of the store and the officers forced him to get down.

He said the officers told him they were just doing their jobs, and he fit the description.

Pinckney was in Columbia earlier in the day for the Legislature’s continued session but returned to Charleston and was in the church for a service at the time of the shooting, a Statehouse Democratic caucus member said.

Pinckney, 41, was elected to the S.C. House of Representatives in 1996 at the age of 23.

In 2000, he was elected to the state Senate at 27. His Senate district includes southern Charleston County and parts of Jasper, Beaufort, Colleton, and Hampton counties.

The Rev. Joe Darby, former longtime pastor of Morris Brown AME several blocks away, was at his Charleston home when he heard the news.

He rushed to the Embassy Suites Hotel around the corner from the shooting to join fellow church members in his district. Darby now is presiding elder of the 33 churches in the AME Church’s Beaufort District.

By 11 p.m. Wednesday night, he still had no news about who had been shot and whether Pinckney was among them. Normally eloquent and outspoken, he was at a loss to describe what happened. “We just don’t know,” he said softly.

The church’s history, so interwoven with Charleston’s, begins around 1816 when Morris Brown, a free shoemaker and devout Methodist, walked out of a predominantly white and racially segregated Methodist Church in Charleston.

Brown formed the African Methodist Episcopal Church of Charleston, now Emanuel AME Church on Calhoun Street. Since that day, the AME Church has proven pivotal in South Carolina in matters of faith and social justice.

Denmark Vesey was a founding member who led failed slave rebellion that drove the church underground for decades, Darby said.

Someone reported the plot to authorities and during the chaos and paranoia that ensued, the church was burned. Congregants slipped underground to worship until 1865 when the church formally reorganized and adopted the name Emanuel.

As the shock of the shooting began to sink in, Riley said, “I know I speak to all the citizens of our community as I express my most heartfelt condolences to the families and friends of the Emanuel AME church members who were killed tonight. We will comfort and support them as we work through this time of great heartbreak.”

Source: http://www.postandcourier.com/article/20150617/PC16/150619408

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Charleston church shooting suspect, 21-year-old Dylann Roof in custody; nine victims identified

CHARLESTON, South Carolina  — [Latest developments]

• During his first court appearance on Thursday, Charleston church shooting suspect Dylann Roof waived extradition to South Carolina, a court official said. Roof was taken into custody in Shelby, North Carolina.

• Charleston County Coroner Rae Wooten identified the nine shooting victims as follows: Cynthia Hurd, 54; Susie Jackson, 87; Ethel Lance, 70; Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor, 49; Hon. Rev. Clementa Pinckney, 41; Tywanza Sanders, 26; Rev. Daniel Simmons Sr., 74; Rev. Sharonda Singleton, 45; Myra Thompson, 59.

• The gunman allegedly told the victims before the shooting, “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go,” said Sylvia Johnson, a cousin of the church’s slain pastor. She cited survivors of the shooting and was quoted by CNN affiliate WIS.

Dylann Roof

They got him.

The man suspected of killing nine people Wednesday night at a historic African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina, was arrested Thursday morning about 245 miles (395 kilometers) away in Shelby, North Carolina, law enforcement authorities said.

Dylann Roof, 21, of Lexington, South Carolina, was taken into custody without incident shortly before 11 a.m., Shelby police said in a statement. Authorities got a call from a business about a possible sighting of the suspect.

At 10:43 a.m., officers saw the suspect’s vehicle, and stopped it at 10:44 a.m., police said. Roof was the vehicle’s only occupant.

He was armed with a gun when he was arrested, according to a law enforcement official briefed on the investigation. It’s not clear if it’s the same firearm used in the shooting.

A senior law enforcement source told CNN the suspect’s father had recently bought him a .45-caliber gun for his 21st birthday in April.

President Barack Obama mourned the violence and the victims, saying, “Any death of this sort is a tragedy. Any shooting involving multiple victims is a tragedy. There is something particularly heartbreaking about death happening in a place in which we seek solace, we seek peace.”

The slayings took place inside the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, near the heart of Charleston’s tourist district. Six women and three men were killed, including the church’s politically active pastor, the Rev. Clementa Pinckney.

Charleston County Coroner Rae Wooten identified the nine victims as follows: Cynthia Hurd, 54; Susie Jackson, 87; Ethel Lance, 70; Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor, 49; Hon. Rev. Clementa Pinckney, 41; Tywanza Sanders, 26; Rev. Daniel Simmons Sr., 74; Rev. Sharonda Singleton, 45; Myra Thompson, 59.

Wooten told reporters that the victims all suffered gunshot wounds and died as a result of them.

Sylvia Johnson, a cousin of Pinckney, said she heard about what happened inside the church from survivors, according to CNN affiliate WIS.

Johnson said survivors recounted the man coming into the church, asking for Pinckney and sitting next to him during a prayer meeting for an hour. He started shooting and reloaded five times, she said.

When a man pleaded with him to stop, the shooter replied, “You rape our women, and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go,” she said.

A law enforcement official says witnesses told authorities the gunman stood up and said he was there “to shoot black people.”

Police were searching for more information about Roof, whose last name is rhymes with “cough”, and trying to determine whether he had any links to hate groups.

Authorities released a mug shot of him from Lexington County on Thursday. It was taken after a trespassing arrest in April. According to an arrest warrant from a February incident, Roof had an unlabeled pill bottle with a drug believed to be suboxone, which is used to treat opiate addiction. Roof told police a friend gave him drugs. The status of the cases is unclear.

In an image tweeted by the Berkeley County, South Carolina, government, Roof is wearing a jacket with what appear to be the flags of apartheid-era South Africa and nearby Rhodesia, a former British colony that was ruled by a white minority until it became independent in 1980 and changed its name to Zimbabwe.

Three people survived the shooting, including a woman who received a chilling message from the shooter.

“Her life was spared, and (she was) told, ‘I’m not going to kill you, I’m going to spare you, so you can tell them what happened,’ ” Charleston NAACP President Dot Scott told CNN. She said she heard this from the victim’s family members.

Federal authorities have opened a hate crime investigation into the shooting at the oldest AME church in the South, the Department of Justice said.

“The only reason someone would walk into a church and shoot people that were praying is hate,” Charleston Mayor Joe Riley said.

There were 13 people inside the church when the shooting happened — the nine people who were killed and three survivors, South Carolina state Sen. Larry Grooms, who was briefed by law enforcement, told CNN. Two of the survivors were not harmed, he said.

It was not clear if the man targeted any individual.

“We don’t know if anybody was targeted other than the church itself,” Charleston police Chief Greg Mullen said.

Historic significance

Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church has been a presence in Charleston since 1816, when African-American members of Charleston’s Methodist Episcopal Church formed their own congregation after a dispute over burial grounds. Known as “Mother Emanuel,” it’s been the headquarters for civil rights activity over the decades.

It was burned to the ground at one point but was rebuilt. Throughout its history, it overcame obstacle after obstacle — destroyed by an earthquake, banned by the state. But its church members persevered, making it the largest African-American church in terms of seating space in Charleston today.

A call for healing

Authorities said they were shocked not only by the killings but that the violence occurred in a house of worship.

“People in prayer Wednesday evening. A ritual, a coming together, praying, worshiping God. An awful person to come in and shoot them is inexplicable,” Mayor Riley said.

The killing put the nation’s spotlight once again on the Charleston region. Several months ago, Walter Scott, an unarmed black man, was fatally shot in the back by a North Charleston police officer, a killing that was captured on video.

Pinckney backed a bill to make body cameras mandatory for all police officers in South Carolina.

“Body cameras help to record what happens. It may not be the golden ticket, the golden egg, the end-all-fix-all, but it helps to paint a picture of what happens during a police stop,” Pinckney said in April.

Riley, who’s seen Charleston go through ups and downs during his 40 years as mayor, said the city must immediately start the healing process. A community prayer meeting will be held Friday at the College of Charleston, not far from the church, he said.

“We are going to put our arms around that church and that church family.”

‘Sick to our stomachs’

The church sits in an area of Charleston densely packed with houses of worship and well-preserved old buildings. The streets of the neighborhood are normally filled with tourists.

Charleston, as several church leaders pointed out, is known as the “Holy City” because of its numerous churches and tolerant attitude toward different denominations.

“Like everybody out here, we’re sick to our stomachs that this could happen in a church,” said Rep. Dave Mack, a friend of the church’s pastor.

They called for justice, but also for calm. Theirs is a strong community, they said, and this incident wouldn’t tear them apart.

The president of the NAACP expressed his outrage over the shooting.

“There is no greater coward than a criminal who enters a house of God and slaughters innocent people engaged in the study of scripture,” Cornell William Brooks said.

A brief history of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church:

According to it’s website, in 1787, Richard Allen and others of African descent withdrew from St. George’s Methodist Church in Philadelphia because of unkind treatment and restrictions placed upon the worshispers of African descent. After Allen left St. George’s Methodist Church, he and his followers purchased a blacksmith shop for thirty-five dollars. From the blacksmith shop they worshipped and helped the sick and the poor. The blacksmith shop was converted into a church. They called the new church Bethel.

In 1816 Allen called together sixteen representatives from Bethel African Church in Philadelphia and African churches in Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey to meet in Philadelphia. The movement blossomed and the African Methodist Episcopal Chucrh was organized. Richard Allen was the first bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

The AME Church has never strayed from the course charted by Richard Allen. The church is wedded to the spiritual doctrine of “God our Father, Christ our Redeemer, Man our Brother”.

An excerpt from the autobiography of Richard Allen is posted to the church’s website. It reads:

“We had not been long upon our knees before I heard considerable scuffling and loud talking. I raised my head up and saw one of the trustees having hold of the Rev. Absalom Jones, pulling him off his knees, and saying, ‘You must get up, you must not kneel here.’ Mr. Jones replied, ‘Wait until prayer is over, and I will get up and trouble you no more.’ With that he beckoned to one of the trustees to come to his assistance. He came and went to William White to pull him up. By this time prayer was over, and we all went out of the church in a body, and they were no more plagued by us in the church.”

The following statement is posted on the church’s website — going further into the church’s history — dating back to the 1800s:

“The history of Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church reflects the development of religious institutions for African Americans in Charleston. Dating back to the fall of 1787 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Richard Allen founded the Free African Society, adhering to the Doctrines of Methodism established by John Wesley. In 1816, black members of Charleston’s Methodist Episcopal church withdrew over disputed burial ground, and under the leadership of Morris Brown. The Rev. Morris Brown organized a church of persons of color and sought to have it affiliated with Allen’s church. Three churches arose under the Free African Society and were named the “Bethel Circuit”. One of the Circuit churches was located in the suburbs of Ansonborough, Hampstead, and Cow Alley, now known as Philadelphia Alley in the French Quarters of Charleston. Emanuel’s congregation grew out of the Hampstead Church, located at Reid and Hanover Streets.

In 1822 the church was investigated for its involvement with a planned slave revolt. Denmark Vesey, one of the church’s founders, organized a major slave uprising in Charleston. Vesey was raised in slavery in the Virgin Islands among newly imported Africans. He was the personal servant of slavetrader Captain Joseph Vesey, who settled in Charleston in 1783. Beginning in December 1821, Vesey began to organize a slave rebellion, but authorities were informed of the plot before it could take place. The plot created mass hysteria throughout the Carolinas and the South. Brown, suspected but never convicted of knowledge of the plot, went north to Philadelphia where he eventually became the second bishop of the AME denomination.

During the Vesey controversy, the AME church was burned. Worship services continued after the church was rebuilt until 1834 when all black churches were outlawed. The congregation continued the tradition of the African church by worshipping underground until 1865 when it was formally reorganized, and the name Emanuel was adopted, meaning “God with us”. The wooden two-story church that was built on the present site in 1872 was destroyed by the devastating earthquake of August 31, 1886. The present edifice was completed in 1891 under the pastorate of the Rev. L. Ruffin Nichols. The magnificent brick structure with encircling marble panels was restored, redecorated and stuccoed during the years of 1949-51 under the leadership of the Rev. Frank R. Veal. The bodies of the Rev. Nichols and his wife were exhumed and entomed in the base of the steeple so that they may forever be with the Emanuel that they helped to nurture.”

Source: http://fox6now.com/2015/06/18/dylann-storm-roof-arrested-in-north-carolina-according-to-report/

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Church shooting suspect locked up at Charleston Co. detention center

Posted: Wednesday, June 17, 2015 9:08 PM EDTUpdated: Thursday, June 18, 2015 7:57 PM EDT

Source: WBTV Source: WBTV
Source: WBTV Source: WBTV
Dylan Roof (Photo: Lexington County Jail) Dylan Roof (Photo: Lexington County Jail)
Dylan Roof (Source: Facebook) Dylan Roof (Source: Facebook)

CHARLESTON, SC (WCSC) – The 21-year-old man accused of shooting nine people at a historic downtown Charleston church has been locked up at the Al Cannon Detention Center following his extradition from North Carolina.

Charleston County Sheriff’s Office officials said Roof will be held in isolation at the center.

Roof is expected to have a bond hearing on Friday, and will be charged with nine counts of murder.

Attorneys say Dylann Roof waived extradition in a Cleveland County courtroom in North Carolina early Thursday afternoon. Charleston Police Chief Greg Mullen said Roof was taken into custody just after 11 a.m. following a traffic stop in Shelby, North Carolina.

On Thursday afternoon, the Charleston County Coroner’s Office identified the nine people who were killed at a shooting at the Emanuel AME Church.

Coroner Rae Wooten said the following died from Wednesday night’s shooting: 54-year-old Cynthia Hurd, 87-year-old Susie Jackson, 70-year-old Ethel Lance, 49-year-old Rev. DePayne Middleton-Doctor, 41-year-old Rev. Clementa Pinckney, 26-year-old Tywanza Sanders, 74-year-old Rev. Daniel Simmons Sr. (who died at MUSC), 45-year-old Sharonda Singleton and 59-year-old Myra Thompson.

Roof from Lexington, South Carolina was wanted for the murder of nine people at Emanuel AME Church. Authorities identified Roof as the shooting suspect Thursday morning. He was described as a white male, 21 years old, slender/small build, gray sweat shirt, blue jeans and clean shaven, and believed to be driving a dark in color Hyundai Elantra with vehicle tag LGF330.

Public records show Roof was most recently arrested in March in Lexington County on drug charges.

According to police, nine people were killed after shots were fired during a prayer meeting inside Emanuel AME Church on Calhoun Street around 9:05 p.m. Chief Mullen said officers arrived to find eight people dead inside the church. A ninth victim died later at a nearby hospital.

Three people survived the attack, Mullen said.

Mullen said Roof sat through an hour-long bible study before he began shooting church members. He then fled the scene.

Charleston Police released surveillance photos of the suspect during a 6 a.m. news conference. He was later identified by authorities shortly after 10 a.m.

Mullen said the shooting occurred during a prayer meeting at the church.”We woke up today and the heart and soul of South Carolina was broken and so we are grieving and we have some pain we have to go through,” said Gov. Nikki Haley on Thursday. “Parents are having to explain to their kids how they can go to church and feel safe and that’s not something we ever thought we would deal with. Having said that we are a strong and faithful state. We love our state, we love our country and most of all we love each other.”

WATCH: Live 5 News continuing coverage

The shooting is being investigated as a hate crime, Mullen said.

“This is clearly a tragedy in the City of Charleston,” Mullen said.”We are all praying and our hearts go out to the victims and their families as well as this entire community…When officers arrived they found a number of victims inside and we had also individuals who were transported to the MUSC emergency trauma center. As the investigation continued we were able to determine that there were eight deceased individuals inside of the church.”

According to Mullen, one victim was transported to MUSC where they later died.

“We have investigators that are out tracking, leads are coming in and we will continue to do that until we find this individual who carried out this crime tonight and bring him to justice,” Mullen said Wednesday night. “This is a tragedy that no community should have to experience. It is senseless, it is unfathomable that somebody in today’s society would walk into a church when people are having a prayer meeting and take their lives.”

“This is a most unspeakable and heartbreaking tragedy,” said Mayor Joe Riley. “People in prayer on Wednesday evening. A ritual of coming together, praying and worshiping God, and to have an awful person come in and shoot them is inexplicable. Obviously, the most intolerable and unbelievable act possible.”

SLIDESHOW: Shooting reported at downtown Charleston church

“The only reason someone could walk into a church and shoot people praying is out of hate, the only reason,” Riley said. “It is the most dastardly act that one can possibly imagine, and we will bring that person to justice as soon as possible.”

A helicopter assisted law enforcement on the scene. Witnesses reported a big police presence was seen at the Emanuel AME Church on Calhoun Street. The FBI and the Chaplain service are also on the scene.

“We have all the resources that are available to us, not only locally but from the state as well as federal agencies,” Mullen said. “We have resources that are being flown in right now from Washington, D.C. that will help us not only track leads but also work this investigation. And I can say that we will put all effort, we will put all resources and all of our energy in finding the individual who committed this crime tonight.”

“The message to the community is that this is an opportunity for us all to unite because of a significant tragedy that has occurred,” Mullen said.

Mullen said he can understand the anger and upset throughout the community, but he urged calm and unity to pray for the families and help police track down the person responsible.

“And what we need is for the community to look at this and say, ‘We have had enough of this violence, and if we stand up together, we can stop this violence.’ And that’s what we need the community to do,” he said.

Cornell William Brooks, president and CEO of the NAACP, released a statement echoing those sentiments.

Brooks said while he is outraged over the hate crime, the NAACP is sending their prayers and condolences to the victims and their families.

Calhoun Street between Meeting Street and Anson Street, as well as Anson Street between Calhoun Street and George Street remain closed while police continue to investigate.

Man cleared following arrest on scene; Bomb threat called in

A man matching the suspect’s description who was initially arrested at the scene has been released.

The man, identified as local photographer Austin Rich, says he was released after being questioned by police officers.

Around 11:30 p.m., police began pushing media and bystanders across Meeting Street after officers say a bomb threat was reported in the area of the crime scene. Officials announced Thursday at 12:45 a.m. the bomb threat had been called off.

Source: http://www.live5news.com/story/29347341/police-confirm-bomb-threat-at-scene-of-downtown-charleston-shooting

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CAPTURED: Race-hate massacre suspect who ‘shot nine people dead’ at historic South Carolina black church after telling them ‘you’re taking over our country’ is arrested during traffic stop

  • Dylann Roof opened fire at the historic Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina around 9pm on Wednesday, killing nine people – three male victims and six females
  • He fled from the scene but was caught in Shelby, North Carolina on Thursday morning after a member of the public called cops with a report of suspicious activity
  • It has emerged that Roof had entered the church around an hour before the shooting and had joined the bible study group before suddenly opening fire 
  • He let one woman escape so she could tell the world what happened while a child survived by playing dead
  • Among the dead is 41-year-old Reverend Clementa Pinckney, pastor of the church and a South Carolina state senator who leaves behind a wife and two young daughters
  • Obama called the killings ‘senseless’ and said it again highlighted the need for gun control 
  • The U.S. Attorney’s Office has launched a hate crime investigation

The white gunman who allegedly shot dead nine people during a bible study meeting at an African-American church in South Carolina last night has been caught in North Carolina.

Dylann Storm Roof, who sparked an overnight manhunt after fleeing the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, was taken into custody during a traffic stop in Shelby just after 11am.

The 21-year-old was caught after a member of the public spotted his car and called cops to report ‘suspicious activity’, Charleston Police Chief Gregory Mullen said. He was in the car and armed when he was approached by an officer but he was cooperative and taken into custody.

‘In America, we don’t let bad people like this get away,’ said Charleston Mayor, Joseph P. Riley, Jr. at a press conference announcing the arrest.

On Wednesday, Roof, from Columbia, had allegedly entered the church and joined the bible study group before suddenly opening fire an hour later.

One survivor recounted how he reloaded his gun five times as he picked off his victims – killing three females and six males, including the Reverend Clementa Pinckney, who is also a South Carolina state senator.

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In custody: Dylann Storm Roof, 21, allegedly shot dead nine people in South Carolina last night. He is pictured left in an earlier mug shot and right in a jacket showing flags of apartheid-era South Africa and one from white-rule Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe

Stopped: Police can be seen around Roof’s car in Shelby, North Carolina after he was found following a tip from a member of the public

Arrest: The suspected gunman was in the car when he was approached by an officer and had a weapon with him, police said

Search: Police had released these CCTV images showing the suspect as they launched a massive search to find him

Pinckney’s cousin told NBC News that one of the survivors told her they had urged Roof to stop.

‘He just said: “I have to do it. You rape our women and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go”,’ Sylvia Johnson said.

Roof spared one woman so she could ‘tell the world what happened’, eye witnesses recounted, while a five-year-old girl also survived the attack after her grandmother told her to play dead. The gunman then fled.

Police launched a massive manhunt for Roof and released surveillance images showing him and his car, warning the public that he was dangerous. He was eventually caught on Thursday morning.

Roof’s uncle, Carson Cowles, told Reuters that his nephew had received a .45 caliber pistol as a birthday present in April. He called the 21-year-old ‘quiet, soft spoken’ and said he recognized him in the photo released by police.

In another photograph of Roof on Facebook, he is seen glaring at the camera while displaying the flag of apartheid-era South Africa on his jacket. He is also wearing another flag depicting that of white-rule Rhodesia, now called Zimbabwe.

Court records show he was charged with a drugs offense in March 2015 and trespassing in April.

Police have since headed to the home of Roof’s mother, Cowles added.

Of the shooting, Charleston Police Chief Gregory Mullen said: ‘We believe this is a hate crime – that is how we are investigating it.’

On Thursday, the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, the FBI and the U.S. Attorney’s Office have launched a hate crime investigation into the mass shooting, ABC reported. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and other agencies have joined the investigation, Mullen said.

Scene: Police remain outside the cordoned-off Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston on Thursday

Scene: Police remain outside the cordoned-off Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston on Thursday

Prayers: Mourners gather outside Morris Brown AME Church for a vigil the day after a mass shooting in Charleston

Prayers: Mourners gather outside Morris Brown AME Church for a vigil the day after a mass shooting in Charleston

Services: Parishioners applaud during a memorial service at Morris Brown AME Church for the people killed on Wednesday

Services: Parishioners applaud during a memorial service at Morris Brown AME Church for the people killed on Wednesday

Heartbroken: A parishioner wipes her eye during the memorial service at Morris Brown AME Church

Heartbroken: A parishioner wipes her eye during the memorial service at Morris Brown AME Church

Together: Mourners hold hands as they pause outside Morris Brown AME Church during a vigil on Thursday

Together: Mourners hold hands as they pause outside Morris Brown AME Church during a vigil on Thursday

Reflection: Mourners bow their heads in prayer as they take flowers to lay near the site of Wednesday's murder

Reflection: Mourners bow their heads in prayer as they take flowers to lay near the site of Wednesday’s murder

Prayers: Mourners pay their respects outside the church after the street was re-opened a day after the mass shooting

Prayers: Mourners pay their respects outside the church after the street was re-opened a day after the mass shooting

Memorial: Nine-year-old Liam Eller helps move flowers to outside the church after the street was re-opened on Thursday afternoon

Memorial: Nine-year-old Liam Eller helps move flowers to outside the church after the street was re-opened on Thursday afternoon

Overcome: A man holds his head in his hand as he takes a moment beside flowers for the victims

Overcome: A man holds his head in his hand as he takes a moment beside flowers for the victims

Silence: Senator Cory Booker, Rep. John Lewis and Senator Joe Manchin pray with other members of the US Congress during a prayer circle in front of the US Capitol to honor those gunned down last night inside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church

Silence: Senator Cory Booker, Rep. John Lewis and Senator Joe Manchin pray with other members of the US Congress during a prayer circle in front of the US Capitol to honor those gunned down last night inside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church

Moved: US Congressman Jeff Denham (center) prays with Senator Chris Coons (2nd left) and Congresswoman Shelia Jackson Lee (left) in front of the US Capitol in Washington, DC during a moment of silence for the victims on Thursday

Moved: US Congressman Jeff Denham (center) prays with Senator Chris Coons (2nd left) and Congresswoman Shelia Jackson Lee (left) in front of the US Capitol in Washington, DC during a moment of silence for the victims on Thursday

Reverend Clementa Pinckney

Victim: The Reverend Clementa Pinckney, left and right, has been confirmed as one of the dead who was killed in the massacre

The killer is believed to have entered the church around 8pm before taking part in the prayer group for about an hour, police said.

Although it is a black church, it would not be surprising to see a white person – or a person of any other race – attending a gathering there, Charleston’s NAACP President Dot Scott told CNN on Thursday.

Speaking in the NBC interview, Pinckney’s cousin said Roof had specifically asked for the reverend before sitting beside him throughout the meeting.

The Reverend Norvel Goff, a presiding elder for the African Methodist Episcopal Church, told the Washington Post that the suspect ‘walked in, from my understanding, not so much as a participant, but as a brief observer who then stood up and then started shooting’.

Police received the first call about the shooting shortly after 9pm.

Emergency responders found eight people dead inside the church, and one was taken to hospital where they later died, Mullen said on Thursday. Among the dead was Reverend and State Senator Pinckney. On Thursday, photos showed a black cloth placed over Pinckney’s seat in the South Carolina Senate.

Five other victims have been named as Reverend Sharonda Singleton, Ethel Lee Lance, Cynthia Hurd, Myra Thompson and Tywanza Sanders.

Police said that survivors were also found inside the church.

Dot Scott of the NAACP told the Post and Courier that a female survivor told her family members that the gunman said she could escape. He said he was letting her live so she could tell the world what happened.

Meanwhile, family members who were being briefed by chaplains after the shooting reportedly said that a five-year-old girl survived the attack after she was told to play dead by her grandmother.

‘The tragedy that we’re addressing right now is indescribable,’ Mullen said on Thursday morning. ‘No one in this community will ever forget this night.

‘We are committed to do whatever is necessary to bring this individual to justice. We are not leaving any stone unturned.’

Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr added: ‘This is an unfathomable and unspeakable act by somebody filled with hate and with a deranged mind.

‘We’re going to put our arms around this church… We’re going to find this horrible scoundrel.’

And speaking from the White House on Thursday afternoon, President Obama called the murders ‘senseless’.

‘Any death of this sort is a tragedy, any shooting involving multiple victims is a tragedy,’ he said. ‘There is something particularly heartbreaking about death happening somewhere we seek solace and we seek peace.

‘Methodist Emanuel is in fact more than a church, this is a place of worship that was founded by African Americans seeking liberty. This is a sacred place in the history of Charleston and in the history of America.’

He went on: ‘The fact that this took place in a black church also raises questions about a dark part of our history.’

He also spoke out about how the incident again signals the need for stricter gun control.

‘I’ve had to make statements like this too many times,’ he said. ‘Communities have had to endure tragedies like this too many times.

‘We do know that once again innocent people were killed in part because someone who wanted to inflict harm had no trouble getting their hands on a gun.’

A family assistance center has been set up in downtown Charleston for those who lost loved ones in the attack, authorities said.

‘A GIANT AMONG MEN’: PASTOR AND SENATOR WHO WAS SHOT DEAD

One of the dead has been confirmed as Reverend Clementa Pinckney, a pastor who recently led rallies after unarmed black man Walter Scott was shot dead by police two months ago.

The 41-year-old South Carolina native also played a key role in pushing for legislation for officers to wear body cameras by co-sponsoring a bill recently signed into law.

He began preaching at the age of 13, becoming a pastor at the age of 18.

He graduated from Allen University in 1995 before studying at Princeton, the University of South Carolina and the Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary.

He became the youngest ever African American elected to the legislature when he was just 23. He was elected as a state representative in 1996 before being voted on to the State Senate in 2000.

He was also named as one the African American community’s 30 leaders of the future in 1999 in Ebony magazine.

He is survived by wife Jennifer and two young daughters, Eliana and Malana.

His cousin, Kent Williams, said that Pinckney was devoted to his family.

‘He loved his family, took care of his family,’ he said. ‘Just a wonderful guy – what anybody would want in a father, and in a pastor and in a senator anywhere in this country.’

State House Minority leader Todd Rutherford added: ‘He never had anything bad to say about anybody, even when I thought he should. He was always out doing work either for his parishioners or his constituents. He touched everybody.’

State Senator Marlon Kimpson remembered Reverend Pinckney as ‘a giant’ and ‘a legend’.

‘He was the moral compass of the senate,’ he said.

Scene: The gunfire broke out at the 150-year-old Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston on Wednesday night

Scene: The gunfire broke out at the 150-year-old Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston on Wednesday night

Manhunt: A huge manhunt ensued with officers wearing bullet-proof vests and carrying guns

Manhunt: A huge manhunt ensued with officers wearing bullet-proof vests and carrying guns

Scene of horror: Emergency personnel and investigators gather outside the church after the shooting on Wednesday night

Scene of horror: Emergency personnel and investigators gather outside the church after the shooting on Wednesday night

Prayer Circle: Here, a group of several men are seen standing in a circle in front of a hotel near the church for an impromptu prayer service 

Prayer Circle: Here, a group of several men are seen standing in a circle in front of a hotel near the church for an impromptu prayer service

Tragedy: Local residents and church members embraced and consoled one another in the hours following the incident, the police chief described the incident as a 'senseless, unfathomable' tragedy 

Tragedy: Local residents and church members embraced and consoled one another in the hours following the incident, the police chief described the incident as a ‘senseless, unfathomable’ tragedy

It has been suggested that the shooting was timed to coincide with two large political rallies in the city, as just hours before Rev Pinckney met with Hillary Clinton as part of her presidential campaign and Jeb Bush was also due to visit Charleston today but his appearance has now been canceled.

In a statement, the Bush campaign said: ‘Governor Bush’s thoughts and prayers are with individuals and families affected by this tragedy.’

Meanwhile Hillary Clinton tweeted: ‘Heartbreaking news from Charleston – my thoughts and prayers are with you all.’

Following the massacre, officers also investigated a possible bomb threat but several hours later gave the all-clear.

Shona Holmes, a bystander in the aftermath of the shooting, added: ‘It’s just hurtful to think that someone would come in and shoot people in a church. If you’re not safe in church, where are you safe?

Local pastor Thomas Dixon told NBC News that a bible study session was likely underway at the time of the shooting. He said the church holds the sessions every Wednesday.

A heavy police presence remained outside the church and a helicopter was seen assisting law enforcement on the scene in the hours following the shooting, FOX reports.

‘The only reason that someone could walk into a church and shoot people praying is out of hate,’ Mayor Riley added. ‘It is the most dastardly act that one could possibly imagine, and we will bring that person to justice. … This is one hateful person.’

Speaking to CNN on Thursday, the slain pastor’s cousin, Kent Williams, expressed his shock at the nature of the killing.

‘It is devastating that someone would go into God’s house and commit such a crime,’ he said. ‘It is beyond my imagination, I can’t even comprehend this. It tells me that we can’t be safe anywhere… It is despicable.’

Condolences: President Obama, beside Vice President Joe Biden, called the murders 'senseless' from the White House

Condolences: President Obama, beside Vice President Joe Biden, called the murders ‘senseless’ from the White House

Anger: He said it shows the need for gun control. 'Communities have had to endure tragedies like this too many times,' he said

Anger: He said it shows the need for gun control ‘Communities have had to endure tragedies like this too many times,’ he said

Loved: A photo from Thursday shows a black cloth placed over Senator Pinckney’s seat in the South Carolina Senate

Emotional: State Senator Vincent Sheheen gets emotional as he sits next to the draped desk of state Senator Clementa Pinckney

Emotional: State Senator Vincent Sheheen gets emotional as he sits next to the draped desk of state Senator Clementa Pinckney

The attack came two months after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man, Walter Scott, by a white police officer in neighboring North Charleston that sparked major protests and highlighted racial tensions in the area.

The officer in that case has been charged with murder, and prompted South Carolina lawmakers to push through a bill helping all police agencies in the state get body cameras.

In a statement, Governor Nikki Haley asked South Carolinians to pray for the victims and their families and decried violence on religious places.

‘While we do not yet know all of the details, we do know that we’ll never understand what motivates anyone to enter one of our places of worship and take the life of another,’ Haley said.

Soon after Wednesday night’s shooting, a group of pastors huddled together praying in a circle across the street.

Community organizer Christopher Cason said he felt certain the shootings were racially motivated.

‘I am very tired of people telling me that I don’t have the right to be angry,’ Cason said. ‘I am very angry right now.’

Even before Scott’s shooting in April, Cason said he had been part of a group meeting with police and local leaders to try to shore up better relationships.

According to the church’s website, Emanuel AME Church — often referred to as ‘Mother Emanuel’ — is the oldest AME church in the south and has one of the largest black congregations south of Baltimore, Maryland.

The 150-year-old church played an important role in the state’s history, including the slavery era and the Civil Rights movement.

Updated: Charleston Police Chief Gregory Mullen speaks during a news conference on Thursday as the search for the gunman continues

Updated: Charleston Police Chief Gregory Mullen speaks during a news conference on Thursday as the search for the gunman continues

Heartbreaking: Hillary Clinton tweeted to her millions of followers that news of the shooting was 'heartbreaking' and her 'thoughts and prayers' are with Charleston 

Heartbreaking: Hillary Clinton tweeted to her millions of followers that news of the shooting was ‘heartbreaking’ and her ‘thoughts and prayers’ are with Charleston

Statement: South Carolina issued this statement describing the shooting as a 'senseless tragedy' and saying she and others will 'never understand what motivates anyone to enter one of our places of worship and take the life of another' 

Statement: South Carolina issued this statement describing the shooting as a ‘senseless tragedy’ and saying she and others will ‘never understand what motivates anyone to enter one of our places of worship and take the life of another’

THE SIMMERING RACE RELATIONS AND THE HISTORY OF THE EMANUEL AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church has been at the center of tense race relations in South Carolina.

Charleston is known locally as ‘The Holy City‘, due to its large number of churches and historical mix of immigrant ethnic groups that brought a variety of creeds to the city on the Atlantic coast.

The church was formed in 1816 when African-American members of the Charleston’s Methodist Episcopal Church formed thier own congregation.

It is one of the largest and oldest black congregations in the South, and was founded in part by a freed slave who was later executed for organizing a revolt, according to the U.S. National Park Service.

Six years after being set up, one of the church founders was implicated in a slave revolt plot. He wasn’t convicted. But during the case, the church was burned to the ground. It was rebuilt in 1834.

The congregation continued the tradition of the African church by worshipping underground until 1865 when it was formally reorganized, and the name Emanuel was adopted, meaning ‘God with us’.

The state’s endorsement of the Confederacy and slavery ran deep in the 1800s and, in more recent decades, white support for so-called ‘Jim Crow’ segregation laws kept black residents marginalized.The Confederate flag still flies on the grounds of the statehouse in Columbia.

The state was also at the center of the civil rights movement in the 1960s with Martin Luther King being a visitor to the church.

Unarmed black man Walter Scott, who was shot dead by a white police officer, pictured, in South Carolina last month 

Unarmed black man Walter Scott, who was shot dead by a white police officer, pictured, in South Carolina last month

Just two months ago, Reverend Clementa Pinckney attended rallies and services in support of Walter Scott, an unarmed black man who was shot dead by a white police officer, pictured above.

Mr Scott was fleeing a car after being pulled over by a traffic stop when he was fatally wounded by police officer Michael Slanger in nearby North Charleston.

Footage emerged of the officer firing eight times at Scott, provoking outrage and rekindled an ongoing national debate about the treatment of black suspects at the hands of white officers.

Slanger has now been charged with murder and is awaiting trial.

An analysis by The State newspaper in Columbia found that police in South Carolina fired their weapons at 209 suspects during a five-year period. Only a handful of those officers were accused of a crime and none were convicted, the paper found.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3129109/South-Carolina-church-shooter-captured.html

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Suspect In Deadly South Carolina Church Shooting Caught

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CHARLESTON, S.C. (CBS Atlanta/AP) — The suspect behind the deadly Charleston, South Carolina, church shooting has been caught.

Dylann Storm Roof, 21, was apprehended in Shelby, North Carolina, nearly three hours away from Emanuel AME Church.

Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley says Roof was arrested during a traffic stop.

Roof is accused of killing nine people, including the pastor, at the historically black church. Authorities called it a hate crime. CBS News reports worshippers were at the church at the time for Bible study.

Court records show that Roof has one felony drug case pending against him, a past misdemeanor trespassing charge and no other criminal record in the state.

In April, state police say that Roof, of Lexington, was arrested for misdemeanor trespassing in Lexington County. No further details on that charge were immediately available.

The victims of the shooting were six females and three males, Charleston Police Chief Gregory Mullen said Thursday morning.

The FBI will aid the investigation, Mullen told a news conference that was attended by FBI Special Agent in Charge David A. Thomas.

Mullen said in a press conference Thursday morning that the gunman was sitting in a prayer meeting in the church for an hour before the shooting.

President Barack Obama said that he knows several members of Emanuel AME Church, including the pastor who was killed.

“Any death of this sort is a tragedy, any shooting involving multiple victims is a tragedy,” Obama said. “There’s something particularly heartbreaking about a death happening in a place where we seek solace and we seek peace, in a place of worship.”

Obama also touched on the subject of gun control during his speech, saying he’s had to make speeches like these too many times because “someone who wanted to inflict harm had no trouble getting their hands on a gun.”

“At some point, we as a country will have to reckon with the fact that this type of mass violence does not happen in other advanced countries,” Obama said. “It doesn’t happen in other places with this kind of frequency and it is in our power to do something about it. I say that recognizing the politics in this town foreclosed a lot of those avenues right now, but it would be wrong for us not to acknowledge it.”

The Justice Department is opening a hate crime investigation into the shooting.

“Acts like this one have no place in our country,” Attorney General Loretta Lynch said at a news conference in Washington. “They have no place in a civilized society.

“The individual who committed these unspeakable acts will be found and will face justice,” Lynch added. “We will do everything in our power to heal this community and make it whole again.”

Lynch said this crime “has reached into the heart of that community.”

Lynch also confirmed that there is a suspect in custody.

It’s particularly provocative because black churches have been targeted so often. They were bombed in the 1960s, when they served as organizing hubs for the Civil Rights movement. A rash of arsons in the 1990s targeted black churches in the South. Other congregations have survived shooting sprees.

Roof’s childhood friend, Joey Meek, alerted the FBI after recognizing him in a surveillance camera image that was widely circulated, said Meek’s mother, Kimberly Kozny. Roof had worn that sweatshirt over to their house many times as they played Xbox videogames in recent weeks, she added.

Roof also displayed a Confederate flag on his license plate, she said. State court records show only one pending felony drug case against him, and a past misdemeanor trespassing charge.

“I don’t know what was going through his head,” Kozny said. “He was a really sweet kid. He was quiet. He only had a few friends.”

Riley called the shooting “the most unspeakable and heartbreaking tragedy.”

“The only reason that someone could walk into a church and shoot people praying is out of hate,” Riley said. “It is the most dastardly act that one could possibly imagine, and we will bring that person to justice. … This is one hateful person.”

Riley said Thursday morning that there are “far too many guns out there.”

State House Minority leader Todd Rutherford told The Associated Press that the church’s pastor, state Sen. Clementa Pinckney, was among those killed.

Pinckney 41, was a married father of two who was elected to the state house at age 23, making him the youngest member of the House at the time.

“He never had anything bad to say about anybody, even when I thought he should,” Rutherford, D-Columbia, said. “He was always out doing work either for his parishioners or his constituents. He touched everybody.”

This shooting “should be a warning to us all that we do have a problem in our society,” said state Rep. Wendell Gilliard, a Democrat whose district includes the church. “We need action. There’s a race problem in our country. There’s a gun problem in our country. We need to act on them quickly.”

Pinckney’s cousin told WAFF-TV that the gunman specifically asked for the reverend before Bible study and sat next to him before opening fire. The cousin says survivors told her that the gunman told them, “You rape our women and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go.”

The attack came two months after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man, Walter Scott, by a white police officer in neighboring North Charleston that sparked major protests and highlighted racial tensions in the area. The officer has been charged with murder, and the shooting prompted South Carolina lawmakers to push through a bill helping all police agencies in the state get body cameras. Pinckney was a sponsor of that bill.

In a statement, Gov. Nikki Haley asked South Carolinians to pray for the victims and their families and decried violence at religious institutions.

“We’ll never understand what motivates anyone to enter one of our places of worship and take the life of another,” Haley said.

Soon after Wednesday night’s shooting, a group of pastors huddled together praying in a circle across the street.

Community organizer Christopher Cason said he felt certain the shootings were racially motivated.

“I am very tired of people telling me that I don’t have the right to be angry,” Cason said. “I am very angry right now.”

NAACP President Cornell William Brooks said in a statement that the gunman is a “coward.”

“The NAACP was founded to fight against racial hatred and we are outraged that 106 years later, we are faced today with another mass hate crime. Our heartfelt prayers and soul-deep condolences go out to the families and community of the victims at Charleston’s historic Emanuel AME Church,” Brooks said in a statement. “The senselessly slain parishioners were in a church for Wednesday night bible study. There is no greater coward than a criminal who enters a house of God and slaughters innocent people engaged in the study of scripture. Today I mourn as an AME minister, as a student and teacher of scripture, as well as a member of the NAACP.”

Even before Scott’s shooting in April, Cason said he had been part of a group meeting with police and local leaders to try to shore up relations.

The Emmanuel AME church is a historic African-American church that traces its roots to 1816, when several churches split from Charleston’s Methodist Episcopal church.

One of its founders, Denmark Vesey, tried to organize a slave revolt in 1822. He was caught, and white landowners had his church burned in revenge. Parishioners worshipped underground until after the Civil War.

Source: http://atlanta.cbslocal.com/2015/06/18/gunman-kills-9-at-historically-black-church-during-bible-study/

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5-year-old played dead and survived church shooting that killed 9 in Charleston

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Charleston police are searching for a gunman who shot and killed nine people, including a state senator, during a Bible study at a historic Calhoun Street church Wednesday, Chief Greg Mullen said.

Click here for coverage from our Sinclair affiliate in Charleston.

Mullen said the shooter sat inside the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church at 110 Calhoun Street for about an hour before he stood up about 9:05 p.m. and started shooting. Eight people died inside the church and a ninth died at the hospital. Six of the victims were female and three were male, he said.

Family members who were briefed by chaplains at a nearby hotel told ABC News that a 5-year-old child was in the church at the time of the shooting and survived by playing dead.

“This tragedy that we’re addressing right now is indescribable,” Mullen said. “No one in this community will ever forget this night.”

An active manhunt is on for a suspect described as a clean-shaven white male, about 2025 years old, with a slender build. He was wearing a gray sweatshirt or hoodie with distinctive markings, blue jeans and Timberland boots, Charleston police said.

Mullen released surveillance photos of the suspect and the vehicle he was driving that has a distinctive front license plate. Anyone with information is asked to call 1800-CALLFBI.

A source said the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the church’s pastor and a South Carolina state senator, was among those shot. The Rev. Al Sharpton tweeted early Thursday morning that Pinckney died in the shooting, which was later confirmed by other legislators.

Mullen declined to release names of the victims. He said he believes it was a hate crime.

“This is a tragedy that no community should have to experience,” Mullen said. “It’s senseless and unfathomable that someone would go into a church where people were having a prayer meeting and take their lives.”

Police have been patrolling the downtown area around as they search for the suspect. The FBI, State Law Enforcement Division, the coroner’s office and multiple police agencies are on the scene. A helicopter was constantly circling downtown. Mullen said they are getting help from agencies up and down the East Coast, including the FBI.

At 11:25 p.m. police pushed reporters back because of an “immediate threat.” Officers said they were investigating a bomb threat but as of 1 a.m., Mullen said, the bomb threat was cleared.

Mullen said people should stay inside and report any suspicious activity to (843) 743-7200. Buist Academy downtown is closed Thursday and Friday. Charleston County School District offices across the street from the church will remain open, school officials said.

Police took a local photographer wearing a backpack into custody but he was later released. Police said they were still searching for a suspect.

Members of the Emanuel AME Church have been praying in a parking lot near the scene of the shooting. The church is the oldest AME Church in the South and has one of the oldest black congregations in the South.

“The only reason someone could walk into the church and shoot people praying is out of hate,” Mayor Joe Riley said. “The only reason. It is the most dastardly act that I could possibly imagine. And we will bring that person to justice as soon as possible.”

Gov. Nikki Haley released the following statement:

“Michael, Rena, Nalin and I are praying for the victims and families touched by tonight’s senseless tragedy at Emanuel AME Church. While we do not yet know all of the details, we do know that we’ll never understand what motivates anyone to enter one of our places of worship and take the life of another. Please join us in lifting up the victims and their families with our love and prayers.”

Elder James Johnson said Sharpton is planning to arrive in Charleston Thursday. Sharpton was in the Lowcountry earlier this year after Walter Scott was shot to death by former North Charleston police officer Michael Slager. Sharpton pointed out that Pinckney led his prayer vigil for Scott.

U.S. Sen. Tim Scott released this statement on his Facebook page.

“My heart is breaking for Charleston and South Carolina tonight. This senseless tragedy at a place of worship – where we come together to laugh, love and rejoice in God’s name – is absolutely despicable and can never be understood. Tonight we stand together in prayer for Pastor Pinckney and his congregation at Emanuel AME, and for the families who are enduring unimaginable pain at the loss of their loved ones. We will come together as a city and as a state to lift up those who need us most right now. I hope for their sake, and for the people of Charleston, that the perpetrators of this terrible crime are swiftly brought to justice.”

The NAACP also released a statement:

“The NAACP was founded to fight against racial hatred and we are outraged that 106 years later, we are faced today with another mass hate crime. Our heartfelt prayers and soul-deep condolences go out to the families and community of the victims at Charleston’s historic Emanuel AME Church. The senselessly slain parishioners were in a church for Wednesday night bible study. There is no greater coward than a criminal who enters a house of God and slaughters innocent people engaged in the study of scripture. Today I mourn as an AME minister, as a student and teacher of scripture, as well as a member of the NAACP.”

Source: http://kfdm.com/shared/news/top-stories/stories/kfdm_5yearold-played-dead-survived-church-shooting-killed-9-charleston-16709.shtml

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A man looks on as a group of people arrive inquiring about a shooting across the street Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)A man looks on as a group of people arrive inquiring about a shooting across the street Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman) more >
– The Washington Times – Thursday, June 18, 2015

CHARLESTON, S.C. — Black community activists raised alarms Thursday about the mass murder at the historic black church potentially sparking race riots in Charleston, South Carolina.

“We don’t need any more bloodshed and we don’t need a race war,” pleaded J. Denise Cromwell, a black community activists. “Charleston has a lot of racial tension. … We’re drowning and someone is pouring water over us.”

Ms. Cromwell said that nerves were still raw from the fatal shooting two months ago of a black man, Walter Scott, by a white police officer in neighboring North Charleston, which ignited major protests.


SEE ALSO: Obama calls for gun control in wake of ‘senseless’ S.C. church murders


Black activist Michelle Felder, 58, said she feared the city’s young people “aren’t thinking” and might seek revenge, an emotional reaction that she said she understood but was mature enough to resist.

“This is 2015 and we are still going through the same things we went through 50 years ago,” she said. “This is so sickening. We are so tired.”

Religious and political leaders have repeatedly called for calm since the shooting Wednesday night.

Pastor Thomas A. Dixon, a civil rights activist and community organizer, urged the city’s black residents to “keep your emotions under control.”

“We’ve been consistently putting forward a message of remain reserved and stay calm,” said Mr. Dixon, who participated in an afternoon prayer vigil at Morrison Street Baptist Church, a few blocks from Emanuel AME.

Mr. Dixon called the attack “senseless” and a “horrific crime,” but he said the violence was not a new phenomena and stressed that similar attacks have targeted groups other than blacks.

“It is a crime that has happened in Jewish synagogs, Buddhist temples, Catholic churches and movie theaters and now it has come to Charleston to this AME church,” he said.

Source: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jun/18/black-activists-fear-race-war-amid-charleston-shoo/

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Charleston Shooter Was on Drug Linked to Violent Outbursts

Dylann Storm Roof was taking habit-forming drug suboxone
Charleston Shooter Was on Drug Linked to Violent Outbursts

by Paul Joseph Watson | June 18, 2015


Charleston shooter Dylann Storm Roof was reportedly taking a drug that has been linked with sudden outbursts of violence, fitting the pattern of innumerable other mass shooters who were on or had recently come off pharmaceutical drugs linked to aggression.

According to a CBS News report, earlier this year when cops searched Roof after he was acting suspiciously inside a Bath and Body Works store, they found “orange strips” that Roof told officers was suboxone, a narcotic that is used to treat opiate addiction.

Suboxone is a habit-forming drug that has been connected with sudden outbursts of aggression.

A user on the MD Junction website relates how her husband “became violent, smashing things and threatening me,” after just a few days of coming off suboxone.

Another poster on the Drugs.com website tells the story of how his personality completely changed as a result of taking suboxone.

The individual relates how he became “nasty” and “violent” just weeks into taking the drug, adding that he would “snap” and be mean to people for no reason.

Another poster reveals how his son-in-law “completely changed on suboxone,” and that the drug sent him into “self-destruct mode.”

A user named ‘Jhalloway’ also tells the story of how her husband’s addiction to suboxone was “ruining our life.”

A poster on a separate forum writes about how he became “horribly aggressive” towards his partner after taking 8mg of suboxone.

A website devoted to horror stories about the drug called SubSux.com also features a post by a woman whose husband obtained a gun and began violently beating his 15-year-old son after taking suboxone.

According to a Courier-Journal report, suboxone “is increasingly being abused, sold on the streets and inappropriately prescribed” by doctors. For some users, it is even more addictive than the drugs it’s supposed to help them quit.

As we previously highlighted, virtually every major mass shooter was taking some form of SSRI or other pharmaceutical drug at the time of their attack, including Columbine killer Eric Harris, ‘Batman’ shooter James Holmes and Sandy Hook gunman Adam Lanza.

As the website SSRI Stories profusely documents, there are literally hundreds of examples of mass shootings, murders and other violent episodes that have been committed by individuals on psychiatric drugs over the past three decades.

Pharmaceutical giants who produce drugs like Zoloft, Prozac and Paxil spend around $2.4 billion dollars a year on direct-to-consumer television advertising every year. By running negative stories about prescription drugs, networks risk losing tens of millions of dollars in ad revenue, which is undoubtedly one of the primary reasons why the connection is habitually downplayed or ignored entirely.

Source: http://www.infowars.com/charleston-shooter-was-on-drug-linked-to-violent-outbursts/

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Learn more https://jewishpaedophilia.wordpress.com/2015/06/20/opzion-911-false-flag-terror-dylann-roof-allegedly-wanted-to-turn-every-jew-blue-for-24-hours-colour-of-human-sacrifice-he-committed-murders-on-the-33rd-parallel-same-as-israel-his-license/

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8 thoughts on “#OpZion – Another Satanic Freemasonic False Flag Terror Event – Americas 911 Devils Triangle Church Shooting – 9 people shot at 110 Calhoun Street – American terrorists use 911 in their false flag terror events (3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 33, 39) – 911 is a repetitive pattern in American false flag events – Quantum Numerology

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