#OpSwindle – Nazi religious extremist Angela Merkel – Germany, who house Ishtar Gate to the inner city of Babylon, is the enemy of Greece – ‘No’ vote wasn’t just about austerity but continued resistance against ‘occupation’ of Greece – Old men, women and children were slaughtered in Distomo by the Nazis

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AngelaMerkel

Adolf Hitler was born on the 20th of April 1889 in Braunau am Inn, a town in Austria-Hungary and reportedly died on the 30th of April 1945. Raised in a Roman Catholic family, Hitler’s father was reportedly Alois Hitler (possibly Frankenberger), an anti-clerical Roman Catholic and his mother reportedly Klara Pölzl, a devout Roman Catholic. Roman Catholicism being an offshoot of Christianity, which is an offshoot of Judaism, according to two passages of the Bible Jesus was king of the Jews as well as being a Jewish Rabbi.

According to Nazi official Hans Frank, Alois’s mother was employed as a housekeeper for a Jewish family and the 19 year old son of the family Leopold Frankenberger had fathered Alois. This would explain why after Saliva samples were taken from 39 of Hitlers relatives a chromosome found in Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews was found, although some historians dismiss the claim despite mounting evidence that Alois’s father and Hitler were of Jewish stock, because there is reportedly no record produced of Leopold Frankenberger’s existence.

Throughout his life Hitler was a Nazi Christian Satanist and Occultist with a variable belief & personal spiritual struggle throughout life, more religious throughout the early part of his life than towards the end. He was outwardly Christian and deeply religious in the 1920s and early parts of the 1930s, in 1937 Hitler was still a member of the Catholic Church although had fully discarded his belief in the Judeo-Christian conception of God. In 1945 Hitlers sister Paula was recorded as saying “I don’t believe he ever left the [Catholic] church. I don’t know for sure“. Hitler often spoke of his belief in a German Almighty Creator, a Lord, a Savior, a Lord and Savior, a God, a Lord of Creation, of World Spirit, a creator of the universe, a supreme force and an eternal Providence. At least three million members of Hitlers Nazi Party were registered as either Roman Catholic (offshoot of Christianity) or Evangelical Protestant Christians (offshoot of Judaism), 155,000 Nazi soldiers were Jewish.

Hitler was surrounded by and influenced by Roman Catholics, Evangelical Christians, Satanists, Knights Templar, Freemasons, Luciferians, Satanic Occultists of the Vril society and the Thule Society, Rosicrucians, Illuminati, scientific illuminists of the A∴A∴ and Ordo Templi Orientis, Anthroposophists, Theosophists, Neo-Templars and Armanum to give examples. He was involved with people who participated in ritual sex magic as well as human and child sacrifice. Hitlers Chief of the Nazi Party chancellery Martin Bormann was an open Satanist.

Hitler reportedly supported the Deutsche Christen church, he is said to have believed Jesus was certainly an Aryan not a Jew and Jewish apostle Paul falsified the message of Jesus, he believed in the survival of an Aryan humanity. He believed “the stars are not sources of light but worlds, perhaps inhabited worlds like ours“.

Hitler was reportedly a secretive person, he was a fierce opponent of the Vatican hierarchy, he is said to have used religion tactically as an instrument that could be useful for social engineering.

Throughout the duration of the Third Reich Hitler opposed the Jewish perspective of Christianity, he believed it was founded on lies and myths, in perpetual conflict with itself, he believed Jewish Christianity had corrupted the entire world of antiquity. He spoke of how the Jews believe Jesus was the son of a whore and a Roman soldier. He believed Aryan Jesus wanted to act against Jewish world domination so Jewry had him crucified.

Near the end of his life Hitler is said to have believed he was more than a man, a Messianic figure, he was said to have been secular, materialist, scientific and an anti-judaic-religion atheistic Germanic pagan and believed in natural law of selection by struggle and survival of the fittest, he believed God and nature to be the same thing, he believed in sun-worship.

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‘I despise them. Germany is the enemy’: The Greek survivors of Nazi massacre who say ‘No’ vote wasn’t just about austerity but continued resistance against ‘occupation’

  • Old men, women and children were slaughtered in Distomo by the Nazis in revenge for the Greek resistance
  • Many are still traumatised by the events and believe that the Germans still owe the people of Greece a debt for the atrocity 
  • Residents believe that the No vote against German-led EU austerity was in part due to the memory of German occupation
  • Greek PM Alex Tsipras has used this sentiment to his advantage in galvanising the people to back his anti-austerity campaign 

It was the scene of a savage World War II massacre – the murder of 218 old men, women and children in a bitter reprisal against Greek resistance fighters.

Four days after the Allied D-Day landings in Normandy in June 1944 a ruthless battalion of German soldiers took out their frustration and anger on unarmed civilians in Distomo, a country village set below mountains where partisans hid.

Ordering fixed bayonets an SS officer ordered his troops to spare no one – butchering babies, raping women, slitting the throats of small boys and gunning down anyone who tried to run away.

Memory: Eleni Nikolaou-Sfountouri, 82, told MailOnline Berlin owes Greece a huge debt for what the Nazis did during the war, adding: 'I don't think Germans today care about what they did to us Greeks during the war. But they are to blame for the conditions we live under today – them and our own politicians' 

Memory: Eleni Nikolaou-Sfountouri, 82, told MailOnline Berlin owes Greece a huge debt for what the Nazis did during the war, adding: ‘I don’t think Germans today care about what they did to us Greeks during the war. But they are to blame for the conditions we live under today – them and our own politicians’

Slaughter: Mrs Nikolaou-Sfountouri was 11 when her parents (Miltiadas and Condelia, pictured with her in 1940), grandparents and two younger sisters were murdered by Nazi soldiers in the massacre

Slaughter: Mrs Nikolaou-Sfountouri was 11 when her parents (Miltiadas and Condelia, pictured with her in 1940), grandparents and two younger sisters were murdered by Nazi soldiers in the massacre

The youngest victim was two months old, the oldest in their 80s.

More than 70 years later this shameful piece of history – and countless other brutal events throughout the German occupation of Greece – help explain why voters rejected the bail-out plan offered by Berlin and Brussels in Sunday’s referendum.

The events of World War Two are still raw in many memories and the hard-left government of Alexis Tsipras has used the painful episode in Greek history stir support for their stance against the German-led EU demands for austerity.

The “no” vote felt like a continuation the Greek resistance fight against the German occupation
Argyris Sfountouris, 75

Survivor Argyris Sfountouris, 75, told MailOnline: ‘The “no” vote felt like a continuation the Greek resistance fight against the German occupation.’

Mr Sfountouris was just four years old when his parents were murdered in the massacre in Distomo in 1944.

Taken in by an orphanage in Switzerland he battled to gain an education and became a physics teacher. Now he returns to his home village for holidays.

He told MailOnline: ‘There has never been a true friendship between Germany and Greece after what happened here during the war. And that lack of trust was partly responsible for the Greek people voting against the so-called “rescue plan” offered by Berlin and Brussels.

‘It was Germany’s refusal to make things easier for us [ease the austerity measures] that made people release their anger towards the Germans.

‘Newspapers [in Germany] have said we are lazy, that we get huge pensions and that we don’t want to work, and most German people believe this is true.’

Many observers believe nobody but Greece is to blame for the country’s current crisis after decades of tax avoidance, financial public spending sprees and widespread cheating of the system.

Murder: In June 1944, a ruthless battalion of German soldiers took out their frustration and anger on unarmed civilians in Distomo, a country village set below mountains where partisans hid

Murder: In June 1944, a ruthless battalion of German soldiers took out their frustration and anger on unarmed civilians in Distomo, a country village set below mountains where partisans hid

Haunted: The Mausoleum in Distomo, Greece, which houses the bones of the 218 killed by the Germans

Haunted: The Mausoleum in Distomo, Greece, which houses the bones of the 218 killed by the Germans

Museum: Pictures of some of the 218 victims massacred by the Germans, on the walls of the Museum for the Victims of Nazism in Distomo, Greece. Ironically, it was paid for by the EU

Museum: Pictures of some of the 218 victims massacred by the Germans, on the walls of the Museum for the Victims of Nazism in Distomo, Greece. Ironically, it was paid for by the EU

The Mausoleum in Distomo pays tribute to the victims

But survivor Eleni Nikolaou-Sfountouri, 82, said Berlin still owes Greece a huge debt for what the Nazis did during the war. She was 11 when her parents, grandparents and two younger sisters were murdered by Nazi soldiers in the massacre.

Mrs Nikolaou-Sfountouri said: ‘I don’t think Germans today care about what they did to us Greeks during the war. But they are to blame for the conditions we live under today – them and our own politicians.

They were the victims of a merciless German attack. I don’t hate them, I despise them. I feel like Germany is the enemy
 Eleni Nikolaou-Sfountouri, 82

‘I have lived through sad times. I had a lovely father who I loved very much. He was a shoemaker and he was a musician, an educated man. Until I was 11-years-old I lived a happy life but then everything changed.

‘Unfortunately I may have to end my days under the same sadness imposed by the Germans [because of the austerity plan] again.

‘My two sons are solicitors and they have suffered financially because of the economic crisis.

‘My granddaughter studies languages. But she cannot go to the college in Crete where she wants to study because my son cannot afford to send her there. That makes me very sad.

‘My niece has a university degree but the only job she can get is as a waitress. If my pension was bigger I would help out my niece but it is not even enough for me.

‘If I could send a message to [German Chancellor] Angela Merkel I would say; “Think about how we [the Greek people] have suffered because of what your country has done to us in the past, so please try to do your best for us now.”‘

Rhetoric: Graffiti like this is not uncommon in the Greek capital Athens. The Greek Prime Minister has used the wounds of WWII to rally support against the German-led EU during debt negotiations

Rhetoric: Graffiti like this is not uncommon in the Greek capital Athens. The Greek Prime Minister has used the wounds of WWII to rally support against the German-led EU during debt negotiations

Intent: One of Prime Minister Tsipras' first acts when he was elected was to leave flowers on a monument at the Kessariani site where hundreds of members of the Greek Resistance were executed by Nazis

Intent: One of Prime Minister Tsipras’ first acts when he was elected was to leave flowers on a monument at the Kessariani site where hundreds of members of the Greek Resistance were executed by Nazis

Debt: Tsipras has demanded Germany pay back more than €160 billion (£112billion) in Second World War reparations. This included a €11 billion loan Greece was forced to give the Nazis during the occupation

Debt: Tsipras has demanded Germany pay back more than €160 billion (£112billion) in Second World War reparations. This included a €11 billion loan Greece was forced to give the Nazis during the occupation

Mrs Nikolaou-Sfountouri added: ‘After the massacre I was an orphan. I cannot live without the memories of what happened on that day. I was brought up by my grandmother and I married a lovely man, but I cannot forget that terrible day.

‘The people [of Distomo] did nothing to deserve what happened to them. They were the victims of a merciless German attack. I don’t hate them, I despise them. I feel like Germany is the enemy.’

A museum for the massacre victims has been built in the centre of the quiet and pretty village. A theatre, showing a 20-minute history film about the massacre, was built five years ago, with EU money. A mausoleum holding the bones of the dead sits on the hill overlooking the village.

RAPED, BURNED AND SLAUGHTERED: HOW THE SS DESTROYED DISTOMO

German troops from the 4th SS Panzer Grenadier Davison rolled into the sleepy village of Distomo on Saturday 10 June 1944 looking for revenge.

Earlier their comrades had been ambushed by Greek partisans hiding out in mountains nearby, killing 40 German soldiers.

SS Company Fuhrer Fritz Lautenbach ordered his troops to execute the 12 Greek peasants they had taken hostage of their way into the village.

Lautenback then instructed his soldiers to fix bayonets and go door to door and kill anyone they found – women, children and old men.

Evil: SS soldiers Fritz Lautenbach (left) and Kurt Rickert (right) were among the Nazis who fixed bayonets and indiscriminately set about killing the residents of the village
Evil: SS soldiers Fritz Lautenbach (left) and Kurt Rickert (right) were among the Nazis who fixed bayonets and indiscriminately set about killing the residents of the village

Evil: SS soldiers Fritz Lautenbach (left) and Kurt Rickert (right) were among the Nazis who fixed bayonets and indiscriminately set about killing the residents of the village

Over the next few hours German soldiers murdered, raped, burned and slaughtered their way through the community. Infants, some just days old, were bayonetted in their cribs. Pregnant women were stabbed in the stomach. The Greek Orthodox priest was beheaded. Children were garrotted.

Some terrified villagers managed to run away, escaping to nearby caves by the beach. Others hid for hours in their homes as the slaughter continued around them.

By the end over 200 had been killed. Their mutilated bodies lay strewn along the streets. No one dare move them for days.

Survivors did not return to their homes for months. When they did the whole community dressed in black – in mourning – including the village’s children that were not sent to orphanages abroad.

Revenge: Women standing In the graveyard of Distomo, Greece, where victims of a 1944 Nazi massacre are buried. The attack was punishment for an attack by partisans

Revenge: Women standing In the graveyard of Distomo, Greece, where victims of a 1944 Nazi massacre are buried. The attack was punishment for an attack by partisans

The sound of laughter was not heard in the village for seven years, one survivor has claimed.

Axis power Italy invaded Greece in October 1940 but Greek forces held back their advance and pushed them back into neighbouring Albania against over-whelming odds.

However Germany pushed through Greek defences in April 1941 and had occupied the country three months later.

The Nazis imposed a collaborationist government although Greek partisans continued to take on German forces across the country’s mainland and many islands, particularly Crete.

A huge number of civilians died from starvation during the German occupation, an estimated 40,000 in Athens alone.

Tens of thousands of others were executed by the Nazis in reprisals against attacks by Greek partisans.

German forces finally fled Greece in October 1944 as the Third Reich began to collapse, following the Normandy landings in France and the fall of Stalingrad, in Russia. 

In the 1960s the German government paid for residents of Distomo to learn professional trades in Germany in an act of goodwill.

But the attempts by village residents to sue the German state for war reparations have failed, with Berlin saying the issue was settled in a 1961 deal in which it paid the equivalent of €25million (£18 million) to Athens.

Prime Minister Tsipras, of the hard-left Syriza party, has been outspoken about the debt that Germany owed Greece, not the other way round.

He spoke to a captive audience when he called for Germany to pay back more than €160 billion (£112billion) in Second World War reparations. This included a €11 billion loan Greece was forced to give the Nazis during the occupation.

Mr Tsipras told the Greek parliament in March: ‘The government will work in order to honour fully its obligations. But at the same time, it will work so that all of the unfulfilled obligations to Greece and the Greek people are met.’

In a symbolic first act as Prime Minister he visited a memorial to 200 Greek resistance fighters executed by the Nazis in May 1944.

Christos Papanikolaou, curator of the Distomo Victims museum, added: ‘Germany has not fulfilled its obligations to Greece for what happened during World War II.’

The Nazi war machine subdued Greek resistance in a matter of weeks in 1941 after the country had defiantly held out against Mussolini’s invading Italian army for months.

It isn’t lost on observers of the current crisis that Greeks celebrate the day they said No to Mussolini every year on October 28. It is called Oxi Day, or No Day. Oxi was plastered all over posters in the run up to the recent referendum and would have evoked memories of World War Two.

But more than 160,000 Greek civilians were killed during World War II, and tens of thousands more died of starvation during the 1941-1944 German occupation.

Struggle: Argyris Sfountouris, 75, told MailOnline that the  

Struggle: Argyris Sfountouris, 75, told MailOnline that the  “no” vote ‘felt like a continuation the Greek resistance fight against the German occupation.’ He was just four when his parents were butchered

A proud nation which remembers heroes from ancient times like distant cousins, modern day Greece dates back to the early 1800s when the first nationalists rose up against their Ottoman rulers.

This 200-year-old struggle for self-determination, in which hundreds of thousands died in their battle against ‘slavery’, has shaped the Greek pride in being defiant against hopeless odds, whatever the consequences.

A traditional Greek ballad, sung during the country’s two national holidays which celebrate liberation from the Ottoman Turks and liberation from the German occupation, evokes the spirit of defiance and freedom.

The lyrics say: ‘Greece never dies, no bullying or threats will intimidate us. We may be halted but after a rest we will regain our strength and march on to glory!’

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3152216/I-despise-Germany-enemy-Greek-survivors-Nazi-massacre-say-No-vote-wasn-t-just-austerity-continued-resistance-against-occupation.html

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